Fashion

1960 – Chemstrand Carefree Cardigans

These mid-century Acrilyn Helen Harper Sweaters are washable

As we continue the MidCenturyPage.com sweater collection, we go to 1960 and find this ad for Helen Harper cardigans. The 2 page ad was published in the September 1960 edition of Mademoiselle magazine. It features 2 cable knit button up cardigans with a knit collar.

Sweaters in sizes 34-40 in olive heather, regal purple, dynasty gold, corsair taupe, monarch blue, white and black. $8.

Like yesterday’s post that showed a 1963 Joan Marie sweater made with Dupont’s Orlon acrylic fiber, this ad also does double duty. It advertises both Helen Harper sweaters, and the fiber used to knit them. Here the acrylic fiber is not made by Dupont, but Chemstrand. Their knitwear fiber is called Aryilan.

Chemstrand Acrilan Logo – Mademoiselle September 1960

The ad contains a bit of wordsmith trickery. They use the same wording as one would describe a sweater made with virgin wool.

You simply won’t believe you can toss these luxurious cable-knits in the washing machine. You can because they’re 100% virgin Acrilan acrylic fiber.

I always find it interesting to read the small print in these mid-century ads that advertise long gone products. Here they tell us that Chemstrand has 2 US plants. Their Acrilan acrylic fiber is made in Decatur Alabama and their Nylon is made in Pensacola, Florida. Thanks to the magic of the internet, here’s a peek at what these plants looked like in the mid-century.

Chemstrand Plant in Decatur AL from the Alabama Department of Archives and History

Chemstrand Plant in Pensacola, Florida from the Florida State Archives and History

2 comments on “1960 – Chemstrand Carefree Cardigans

  1. Pingback: 1960 – Bright and Bulky – Mid-Century Page

  2. Pingback: 1957 – Charm Bracelet and Banlon Sweater – Mid-Century Page

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